Liberal education and the connection with Vygotsky’s theory of the zone of proximal development

Nguyen, M. A. (2017). Liberal education and the connection with Vygotsky’s theory of the zone of proximal development. Cultural-Historical Psychology, 13(1), 81–88. (p-ISSN: 1816–5435; e-ISSN: 2224–8935) (in English & Russian)

Liberal education came into recognition in Roman Empire, spread throughout Europe during the six- teenth century and has become a revolution in the United States in the last centuries. The term “liberal education” has roots in the Latin word for a free person (liber) and the artes liberales emerged historically as the education appropriate for free people. In the modern world, and especially in the United States after the American Revolution, liberal education drew on these roots to position itself as the best preparation for self- governance in a free democratic society. At Hoa Sen University, liberal education has been chosen as a way to develop students, alongside their professional preparation. In the search for best application options of liberal education, the author realized the connection between liberal education philosophy and Vygotsky’s educational approach, as known as the zone of proximal development. This article analyzes the perspectives of liberal education and its logical connection with Vygotsky’s theory of the zone of proximal development.

Keywords: liberal education, freedom, Vygotsky, zone of proximal development, scaffolding.

http://psyjournals.ru/files/86727/kip_2017_n1_Nguyen.pdf

image